Samantha says:

"There are one or two slightly offensive suggestions scattered amid the more complimentary phrases but I am prepared to rise above that if you are."

Scroll down for fuller quotations.


Ms Samantha Mann is simply delightful.
— Janis La Couvée, Dispatches from the Victoria Fringe
Do not think of this as therapy in public, think of it as an exposé of the mores of Middle England... Charming with an acerbic underside.
— Ian Parker Heath, Buxton Fringe Review
Outstanding... incredibly clever... A class act.
— Rufus McAlister, Buxton Fringe Review
What seems, at face value, to be a light-hearted comedy about an inept middle-aged spinster attempting poetry is actually a very, very clever piece of solo theatre... one of the best performances I’ve seen.
— Chris Neville-Smith, calling Samantha the Best Individual Performance of 2014
Delivering plenty of laugh-aloud surprises yet concealing a sharp-edged poignancy too.
— Richard Stamp, Fringe Guru
Wry, mischievous and strangely moving, Samantha Mann’s Stories About Love, Death & A Rabbit is a beguiling and ultimately uplifting experience - something like the secret life of Miss Prism imagined by Alan Bennett and performed by Hinge or Bracket.
— Ben Walters, nottelevision.net
With such a tour de force of acting it almost wouldn’t have mattered what the poetry was like, but it turned out to be just the right level of painfully mediocre.
— Koel Mukherjee, Sabotage
Samantha Mann is a minutely observed comic creation for those who love cringe humour.
— Roger Cox, The Scotsman
Delightfully feminist... It’s a feel-good hit.
— Chella Quint, The F-Word Comedy
The one thing that I can be certain of from this piece is that Samantha is a consummate and delightful character.
— Isla Van Tricht, Broadway Baby

Review of Stories About Love, Death & A Rabbit at the 2017 Victoria Fringe Festival by Janis La Couvée, in Dispatches from the Victoria Fringe:
"At one time Victoria was awash in maiden aunts like Ms Samantha Mann—genteel, civilized, educated, tied with strong bonds to family and whiling away the days as life slowly passed them by. Some, like Samantha, can pinpoint with exactitude the moment things shifted. This is extremely clever work, a character everyone can’t help but fall in love with, happily dithering away and absolutely refusing to get to the point—tangential reflections piling up one on top of the other, hinting, always hinting, at missed opportunities and deep emotional wounds. And then, voilà, now comfortable with the audience, come the revelations of hidden talents and hopes, of daring to take a chance.... Ms Samantha Mann is simply delightful, anyone would be happy to spend an entertaining and lively hour in her company and would not fail to be moved by her eloquent and expressive storytelling."


Review of You Bring The Agony, I'll Bring The Aunt at the 2016 Buxton Fringe Festival by Ian Parker Heath of Buxton Fringe Review:
"Ms Mann is no stranger to the Fringe and with this helping of 'help' she may have found her metier. As you might expect from the title, the show centres upon the agonies of the audience and your soon-to-be favourite Agony Aunt and part-time librarian's advice on resolving them... Do not think of this as therapy in public, think of it as as an exposé of the mores of Middle England. Witty and delivered with an assured confidence, Charles Adrian has created one of those characters you'll remember after the Fringe has finished. The audience last night loved the spinster-librarian who is a member of that long tradition of much put upon ladies who take an almost forbidden delight in sniping at those whose manners are, how shall we say this, strained. Remember the continuity announcer from the late Victoria Woods shows? If I was asked to describe the show in a sentence it would be this: Charming with an acerbic underside.


Review of Stories About Love, Death & A Rabbit at the 2015 Buxton Fringe Festival by Rufus McAlister of Buxton Fringe Review:
"Stories About Love, Death and a Rabbit is an outstanding piece of character comedy. Charles Adrian Gillott plays Ms Samantha Mann, a single, middle-aged, middle-class woman: shy but excitable, restrained but wanting to let go, if only she could bring herself to dance. Her mannerisms are consistent, her frantic speech perfectly paced and the whole character brilliantly observed. The humour is incredibly clever; whilst it is never rude, edgy or provocative, it feels distinctly mature... It’s funny because you are so immersed in the character, which has captivated you from the very beginning. I can’t hope to explain it; it is just wonderfully written and charismatically performed. There are poignant moments too, as Samantha gives poetic musings on death and living life with too much fear, changing the tone, but not at all out of place. She does not end there, though, and leaves us with a hilariously understated piece of physical comedy, which I won’t spoil. Gillott is clearly a talented comedian and comedy actor, and this is a class act."


Bruce Dessau reviewing the 2015 Old Comedian Of The Year competition:
"Ms Samantha Mann was the biggest oddball of the evening. She – I think it was a she – claimed to be a poet rather than a stand-up and wondered in her posh voice if she should be there at all. The audience was confused, but clearly amused by this character and again I could have seen a different set of judges awarding the prize to Mann just for being the most refreshingly off the wall contestant. But again, Mann had to make do with the glory of being a finalist."

Steve Bennett reviewing the 2015 Old Comedian Of The Year competition:
"Yet another character next, with the intriguing Ms Samantha Mann, the creation of Charles Adrian Gillott and a genteel, well-spoken poet who probably thinks Radio 4 has got a bit too racy since it stopped being the Home Service. She’s put off whenever the audience laughs at her oh-so serious musings, so making it forbidden and all the more potent. And since there’s plenty of wry, off-the-wall wit in the writing, there are plenty of giggles to be stifled during this classy, different act."


Chris Neville-Smith, of chrisontheatre.wordpress.com, on calling Samantha the Best Individual Performance of 2014:
"What seems, at face value, to be a light-hearted comedy about an inept middle-aged spinster attempting poetry is actually a very, very clever piece of solo theatre. The main joke is supposed to be that Samantha Mann barely gets around to doing any poetry, instead waffling away to the audience with one digression after another, but it is in these digressions that the story comes together. And to cleverly piece together this story under the cover of such convincing hesitation, repetition and digression is one of the best performances I've seen, easily up there with the best performances I've seen in full-scale full-budget professional shows."

Review of Stories About Love, Death & A Rabbit at the 2014 Buxton Fringe Festival by Richard Stamp of Fringe Guru:
"This delightful show sits halfway between comedy and solo theatre, delivering plenty of laugh-aloud surprises yet concealing a sharp-edged poignancy too. Hosted by middle-aged librarian Ms Samantha Mann, it's a broad-ranging monologue about loves lost, lives lived... and the trials of sharing her home with a rabbit. Though she seems at first prim and practical, Samantha gradually reveals both an intriguing past and an adventurous personality, stumbling through a public journey of self-discovery which I felt positively privileged to join her on."

Something from Ben Walters, of nottelevision.net:
"Wry, mischievous and strangely moving, Samantha Mann's Stories About Love, Death & A Rabbit is a beguiling and ultimately uplifting experience - something like the secret life of Miss Prism imagined by Alan Bennett and performed by Hinge or Bracket."


Review of what Samantha calls "my winning effort" at the 2014 Anti-Valentine's Anti-Slam by Koel Mukherjee, of Sabotage:

"Watching her was so, so entertaining, not least because she was so recognisable as an open mic archetype. I've seen that poet - awkward, apologetic, disorganised, self-deprecating - in fact, I'm pretty sure I've been that poet. With such a tour de force of acting it almost wouldn't have mattered what the poetry was like, but it turned out to be just the right level of painfully mediocre. 'I am nobody's wife... and nor do I want to be... just yet (I was brought up on second wave feminism).' The sight of Mann agonising over expressing such banal and clumsy words was both endearing and hilarious."


Reviews of An Evening With Samantha at the 2013 Edinburgh Festival Fringe:

"A lady of a certain age who believes official forms should have a 'long-term single' option, to help differentiate between people like her and single people for whom a change in relationship status might be just around the corner, Samantha Mann is a minutely observed comic creation for those who love cringe humour." Roger Cox, The Scotsman

"Ms Samantha Mann, a drag persona created by the lovely Adrian Gillott, has a full solo show that is delightfully feminist. Samantha shares her story of how she doesn't ask for permission - just starts living her life to the full and breaking out of her societally- and self-imposed expectations. It's a feel good hit." Chella Quint, The F-Word Comedy

"Whilst in the Fringe Guide this show rests under the category of 'Spoken Word' with a subcategory of 'comedy' I'm not sure I could call it either, as, although certain aspects of those genres are present in An Evening With Samantha, they are far from the predominant or the most excellent aspects of this experience. With a show containing conversations with the audience, a spoken word guest, anecdotes, memories and tap dancing, Samantha Mann (who is, if you haven't guessed from the show photo, a man in drag) invites you to spend a bizarre and unique evening with her. The one thing I can be certain of from this piece is that Samantha is a consummate and delightful character: Nervous, well-spoken, eccentric, and dressed in a brown curly wig; glasses; white gloves; and a pea-green coat and long dark skirt, Samantha made me feel contrary combination of unease and discomfort throughout the show. I found myself utterly engaged in her character, waiting to see what she would do next." Isla Van Tricht, Broadway Baby


Photograph at the top of this page by Katherine Leedale